MSN Home  |   Hotmail  |   Shopping  |   Money  |   People & Groups
Windows Live ID
go to MSNGroups 
Groups Home  |  My Groups  |  Help  
 
Important Announcement Important Announcement
The MSN Groups service will close in February 2009. You can move your group to Multiply, MSN’s partner for online groups. Learn More

THE GUN ROOMTHEGUNROOM@uk.msnusers.com 
  
What's New
  
  HOME PAGE  
  "DISCLAIMER"  
  EMAIL SETTINGS  
  GUN ROOM RULES  
  General  
  BOARD LIST  
  GUN RIGHTS  
  FUNNY STORIES  
  MEMBERS INFO  
  MYRIGHTS Tribute  
  OPEN CARRY.ORG  
  GUNSMITHING  
  Chat Room  
  BUY/SELL/SWAP  
  HUNTER TIPS  
  SURVIVAL TIPS  
  SPORTSMEN TIPS  
  SHOOTING TIPS  
  GUN QUESTIONS  
  LIBRARY OF INFO  
  MILITARY NEWS  
  GUN REVIEWS  
  PET LOADS  
  CARTRIDGES  
  GUN MYTHS  
  CCW STATE LAWS  
  STATE GUN LAWS  
  Pictures  
  TARGETS  
  TRAP SHOOTERS  
  LINKS  
  WEBSITES  
  ONLINE STORES  
  MANUFACTURERS  
  AMMO SITES  
  GUN MAKERS  
  HUNTING RESOURCES  
  HANDLOADING(1)  
  HANDLOADING(2)  
  HANDLOADING(3)  
  HANDLOADING(4)  
  HANDLOADING(5)  
  HANDLOADING(6)  
  HANDLOADING(7)  
  BLACKPOWDER  
  MUZZLE LOADING  
  GUNPOWDER TIP  
  BULLET CASTING(1)  
  BULLET CASTING(2)  
  HEADSTAMPS  
  HEADSPACE  
  BALLISTICS  
  MASTER EYE  
  ACCURACY (1)  
  ACCURACY (2)  
  ACCURACY (3)  
  SHOT PLACEMENT  
  SHOT PLACEMENT2  
  RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP(1)  
  RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP(2)  
  RANGE DETERMINATION  
  SAFETY INFO(1)  
  SAFETY INFO(2)  
  SAFETY INFO(3)  
  SAFETY INFO(4)  
  GELATINE TESTS  
  SOURCE STUDIES  
  EMOTICONS 1  
  EMOTICONS 2  
  EMOTICONS 3  
  SCOPES(1)  
  SCOPES(2)  
  RIFLE SCOPES  
  GUN ROOM LINK  
  STATE HUNTING  
  HUNTING INFO(1)  
  HUNTING INFO(2)  
  HUNTING INFO(3)  
  HUNTING INFO(4)  
  HUNTING INFO(5)  
  HUNTING INFO(6)  
  HUNTING INFO(7)  
  HUNTING INFO(8)  
  HUNTING INFO(9)  
  HUNTING INF0(10)  
  HUNTING INFO(11)  
  HUNTING INFO(12)  
  FIELD DRESSING DEER  
  VENISON RECIPES  
  VENISON RECIPES(2)  
  GAME RECIPES  
  AGE DETERMINATION  
  BLACK BEARS(1)  
  BLACK BEARS(2)  
  BLACK BEARS(3)  
  GRIZZLY BEARS(1)  
  GRIZZY BEARS(2)  
  HANDGUN SHOOTING  
  BASIC DRAW  
  WEAVER STANCE  
  ISOSCELES(1)  
  ISOSCELES(2)  
  SHOOT HANDGUN(1)  
  SHOOT HANDGUN(2)  
  SHOOT HANDGUN(3)  
  BOWHUNTING (1)  
  BOWHUNTING(2)  
  TIPS FOR WOMEN(1)  
  TIPS FOR WOMEN(2)  
  RIGHTS LINKS  
  PRO-GUN RIGHTS  
  FOUNDING FATHERS  
  WHAT CAN YOU DO TO PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS  
  DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE  
  THE BILL OF RIGHTS  
  AMENDMENTS 11-18  
  AMENDMENTS 19-27  
  LEST WE FORGET  
  CONTACTING CONGRESS  
  GUN INFORMATION  
  LINKS TO D.C. AND MORE  
  YOUR CHOICE  
  MANUALS  
  THE SLING  
  GAMES & MORE  
  
  
  Tools  
 
How to shoot a handgun accurately
By Massad Ayoob



“I want you to do an article on how to shoot a handgun accurately,?Dave Duffy told me. “Make it 2,500 or 3,000 words.?

Long ago, I would have answered, “Sure, and while I’m at it, how about a history of the world in, oh, 10,000 words or so??

Nancy Crenshaw uses strong stance and technique to make up for lack of size as she turns in an excellent one-handed high speed performance with SIG 9mm.
Nancy Crenshaw uses strong stance and technique to make up for lack of size as she turns in an excellent one-handed high speed performance with SIG 9mm.

Today, with more than 45 years of handgunning behind me (yeah, I’m old, but I started early, too) I realize that you actually can cover this topic in a fairly short article. The reason is found in the classic statement of Ray Chapman, the first world champion of the combat pistol. “Shooting well is simple,?Ray said, “it just isn’t easy.?

I’ll buy that. It’s true that the handgun is the most difficult of firearms to shoot well. There’s less to hang on to. There’s a shorter radius between the front and rear sight than with a rifle, meaning a greater unnoticed human error factor in aiming. You don’t have that third locking point on the shoulder that you have with a long gun’s butt stock.

And few handguns have the inherent mechanical accuracy of a good rifle.

That said, though, you can get the most of your handgun’s intrinsic accuracy by simply performing marksmanship basics correctly. If the gun is aimed at the target, and the trigger is pressed and the shot released without moving the gun, then the bullet will strike the mark. That simple. We need a few building blocks to construct this perfect shot, however. Let’s build the structure brick by brick.

This student demonstrates a strong Weaver stance at an LFI class. Feet are in proper pyramidal base, upper body is forward, and he is firmly grasping his .40 caliber Walther P99.
This student demonstrates a strong Weaver stance at an LFI class. Feet are in proper pyramidal base, upper body is forward, and he is firmly grasping his .40 caliber Walther P99.

I teach my students a five-point “pre-flight check list?to go through before they fire the shot. As with any structure, you start from the bottom up. Those points are: 1) Strong stance. 2) High hand grasp. 3) Hard grip. 4) Front sight. 5) Smooth rearward roll of the trigger.

The “power stance?/H3>

I’ve found that stance is the one thing I’m likely to have to correct first, even when teaching the experienced shooter. The edgeways stance of the duelist is necessary for skateboarding or surfing, but counter-productive to good shooting. If one heel is behind the other, the body does not have good lateral balance and will tend to sway sideways. (The miss will most commonly go toward the strong hand side.) If the feet are squared off parallel, in the old “police academy position?so often seen on TV, the body does not have good front to back balance, and the shots will tend to miss either high or low, most commonly the latter.

You want to be in a fighter’s stance, a boxer’s stance, what a karate practitioner would call a “front stance.?The lower body needs a pyramidal base, a triangle with depth. If you are right handed and firing with your strong hand only, the pelvis wants to be at about a 45 degree angle vis-à-vis the target, with your left leg to the rear. If you are shooting two-handed and are right hand dominant, the hips still want that 45-degree angle but the left leg should now be forward and the right leg back. Now you’re balanced forward and balanced back, balanced left and balanced right. It’ll be easier to hold the gun on target.

In rapid fire, the shoulders want to be forward. This will get body weight in behind the gun and help control recoil. For very precise slow fire, some shooters like to cantilever the shoulders to the rear. This may make the gun seem to hang steadier with less effort, but it will cause the gun to jump up sharply upon recoil. This not only slows down your rate of sustained fire, but subconsciously, the more the muzzle jumped at the last shot, the more likely you are to jerk the trigger on the next one. Personally, I use the power stance with the shoulders at least slightly forward even in slow fire. Master shooters have a phrase that helps them remember this principle more easily: “Nose over toes.?

High hand grip, thumb curled down for strength, index finger at distal joint on trigger for maximum leverage. This is the grasp author used to win IDPA NH State Championship in 2003 with this stock service revolver, S&W’s .45 caliber Model 625.
High hand grip, thumb curled down for strength, index finger at distal joint on trigger for maximum leverage. This is the grasp author used to win IDPA NH State Championship in 2003 with this stock service revolver, S&W’s .45 caliber Model 625.

High hand grasp

With a double action revolver, you want the web of your hand all the way up to the rear edge of the backstrap, as shown in the accompanying photos. With a single action frontier-style revolver with the plow-handle shape grip, you still want a high hand grasp. On a semiautomatic pistol, you want the web of the hand so high that a ripple of flesh is seen to bunch up behind the backstrap of the grip at the top edge, where the grip safety would be on a 1911 style pistol.

The higher the hand, the lower the bore axis. This means much better control of muzzle jump and less movement of the pistol upon recoil. Since most handguns, particularly semiautomatics, are designed to be shot this way, it means that you will find it easier to press the trigger straight back as you make each shot. If your hand is too low on the “handle,?a straight rearward pressure on the trigger will tend to pull the muzzle down, placing the shot low.

With a proper high hand grip on an auto pistol such as this Wilson Custom CQB .45, you’ll see this “ripple of flesh?behind the grip tang.
With a proper high hand grip on an auto pistol such as this Wilson Custom CQB .45, you’ll see this “ripple of flesh?behind the grip tang.

A semi-auto is designed to operate as the slide moves against the abutment of a firmly held frame. A low grasp allows the muzzle to whipsaw upward from recoil as the mechanism is automatically cycling, diverting momentum from the slide through the frame. Now the slide can run out of momentum before it has completed its work. This is why holding a pistol too low can cause it to jam.

All these problems are cured with the high hand grasp.

Cont'd....

A special thank you to: Massad Ayoob & American Handgunner Magazine  "Printed with the permission of American Handgunner Magazine
(www.americanhandgunner.com)"

Notice: Microsoft has no responsibility for the content featured in this group. Click here for more info.
 MSN - Make it Your Home