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SCOPE INFORMATION -
 
 
 

 

What the Numbers Mean: The numbers for each scope tell you the scope’s power or magnification rating, whether the magnification can be increased or decreased with a zoom dial, and the diameter of the objective lens. So, a 3-9x40mm is a scope with a variable zoom magnification from 3x to 9x with a 40 millimeter objective lens.

How Much Magnification: Because high-powered riflescopes have a smaller field-of-view than a lower powered scope, choose your magnification with the distance you will be shooting in mind. Use low power for close shots in brush or deep woods and high power when hunting distant game in the mountains, open fields and prairie.

TERMINOLOGY
1. EYE PIECE
2. EXIT PUPIL
3. OCULAR LENS
4. POWER RING
5. WINDAGE ADJUSTMENT
6. ELEVATION ADJUSTMENT
7. OBJECTIVE BELL
8. EYE-BELL
9. OBJECTIVE LENS

 

MAGNIFICATION

The higher the power of magnification, the less bright the image and the less field of view.

High power serves a very useful purpose, but only in the right circumstances. In general, use high magnification when some or all of the following apply: 

1.For target and silhouette shooting.

2.With a bench rest or other support.

3.For small game (varmints).

4.When the target is motionless.

With lower magnification, you enjoy a brighter image and a wider field of view. Use low powers when some or all of these conditions apply: 

1.In dense foliage where a wider field of view is preferable.

2.In low light conditions.

3.For moving targets.

4.At short range, especially with dangerous game.

FIXED vs VARIABLE

Variable power scopes, or zooms, offer the benefits of high, medium and low powers, all in one scope. Zooms are particularly advantageous in changing light, weather, environmental conditions or geographic locations and when you're hunting different types of game. In short, variables enable the hunter to use the scope under various circumstances - from close-in brush hunting to open range hunting.

Fixed or low power scopes are recommended for hunting dangerous game, especially at close range or in dense foliage where a wide field of view is required and where a mistake in distance estimation could have dire consequences.

RETICLES

30/30: Four picket-shaped posts are set at 90 degrees from one another. The center point is created by the crossing of fine crosshairs that connect the opposing pickets. This pattern can be used to measure distance. Using the 30/30 reticle, the crosshair lines represent an area 30" across at 4x from 100 yards away.



Crosshair: A simple pattern consisting of thin horizontal and vertical lines that cross, forming a center aiming point.

Pro-Shot: A 30/30 reticle with an inner center circle that provides an exact aiming point for shotgun use and works as a rangefinder too.

True Mil-Dot? Multiple aiming points to determine the exact distance of a target and also the correct aiming points regardless of distance.

OPTICAL COATING TYPES

Optical coatings reduce reflection both internally and externally and thereby increase the amount of light that reaches the eye which improves brightness and contrast. 

Coated: Lens surfaces are coated to improve light transmission capability. 

Fully Coated: All air-to-glass surfaces are coated. 

Multi-Coated: One or more surfaces or lenses have been coated with multiple films and all surfaces are coated at least once. 

Fully Multi-Coated: All air-to glass surfaces have multiple films. 

Magenta Coating: Reduced reflection, fully coated optics throughout. 

HDC?High Definition Coating: Heat-treated, multi-coated objective and ocular lenses. Fully coated throughout. 

Rubicon® Coated: This coating consists of 14 layers of multi-coating on the objective lenses and is characterized by ruby-red coloring on the objectives. It provides excellent bright daylight and glare conditions viewing because it filters out red light. 

SuperCon? Heat-treated, fully multi-coated optics throughout. 



Red Dot: A single red electronic dot placed in the center of the field of view.

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Coated Optics: Coatings on lens surfaces reduce light loss and glare due to reflection for a brighter, higher-contrast image with reduced eyestrain. Tasco® riflescopes are coated with a microscopic film of magnesium fluoride. More coatings lead to better light transmission.

TYPES OF COATING 
Coated - A single layer on at least one lens. 

Fully-Coated - A single layer on all air-to-glass surfaces. 

Multi-Coated - Multiple layers on at least one lens and all surfaces are coated at least once.

Fully Multi-Coated - Multiple layers on all air-to-glass surfaces. 


Exit Pupil: The size of the column of light that leaves the eyepiece of a scope. The larger the exit pupil, the brighter the image. To determine exit pupil size, divide the objective lens diameter by the power (a 4x40 model has an exit pupil of 10mm). 

Eye Relief: The distance a scope can be held away from the eye and still present the full field of view. Tasco riflescopes provide an extra margin of comfort and recoil safety with extended eye relief and soft neoprene eyepiece guards.

Field of View (F.O.V.): The side-to-side measurement of the circular viewing field or subject area. It is defined by the width in feet or meters of the area visible at 100 yards or meters. A wide field of view makes it easier to spot game and track moving targets. Generally, the higher the magnification, the narrower the field of view.

Magnification (Power): Riflescopes are often described by two numbers separated by an "x". For example: 4x40. The first number is the power or magnification of the scope. With a "4x", the object being viewed appears to be four times closer than when seen with the unaided eye. 

Objective Lens Size: The second number in the formula (4x40) is the diameter of the objective or front lens. The larger the objective lens, the more light that enters the scope, and the brighter the image. 

Ocular Lens: The lens closest to your eye. 

Parallax: A condition that occurs when the image of the target is not focused precisely on the reticle plane. Parallax is visible as an apparent movement between the reticle and the target when the shooter moves his head or, in extreme cases, as an out-of-focus image. Tasco center-fire riflescopes under 11x are factory-set parallax-free at 100 yards; rim-fire and shotgun scopes at 50 yards. Some high power scopes have a special range focus to adjust for parallax.

Precision Adjustments: The windage and elevation adjustments affect accuracy. Windage is the horizontal (left-to-right) adjustment, usually the side turret of the scope. Elevation is the vertical (up-and-down) adjustment, usually the top turret of the scope. Tasco scopes feature 1/4 M.O.A. (1/4" at 100 yards) or finer windage and elevation adjustments with audible clicks for greater precision.

Resolution: Resolution, or definition, is the ability of a scope to distinguish fine detail and retain clarity.

Sealed, Waterproof and Fogproof: Tasco riflescopes remain crystal-clear in all types of weather. All 1" and 30 mm diameter riflescopes are not only nitrogen-purged to remove any vestige of internal moisture, but they are also O-ring sealed to prevent the entry of dust or moisture.

   

Reply
Recommend Delete    Message 9 of 9 in Discussion 
From: GUNROCKETS Sent: 5/29/2003 9:05 AM
RETICLES:

 NIGHT VISION SCOPES:

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Generation 1:
Does not require an active infrared light source. Instead it amplifies available ambient light.

Night Vision Monocular: A Night Vision device for use with one eye.

Angle or Field-of-View: The measure of the angle defining the field visible through the Night Vision systems at a distance of 100 yards.

Eyepiece Focus: Used to match your Night Vision scope or binocular to your specific eyesight.

Image Intensifier or Intensifier Tube: The active component in a Night Vision System that amplifies light and presents a usable image.

Infrared (I.R.) Illuminator: Provides a light source for the system to amplify, yielding enhanced images in very low light conditions such as caves where no ambient light is available for amplification.

Objective Lens: Collects all available light and focuses it on the image intensifier. It also provides image magnification. The best objective lenses have low magnification (5x or less), are high-speed (f2 or faster) and are coated for maximum efficiency in the near-infrared bandwidth.

Phosphor Screen: Positioned at the back of the intensifier tube, the green phosphor screen renders a visible night vision image. The human eye is most sensitive to green contrasts.

Photocathode: Converts light (photon energy) into electrons (electrical energy) which are then amplified in the intensifier. The objective lens focuses available light on the photo-electric surface of the photocathode which is excited and passes electrons within the tube.

Resolution: A measure of the ability to render and display a detailed image. Image intensifier resolution remains constant and is expressed as the maximum number of line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) that can be discerned with a black-and-white stripe pattern is focused on the photocathode.

 
Generation 1 Night Vision:   How It Works.

Generation 1 Night Vision monoculars collect any available ambient light with an objective lens, just like any spotting scope or binocular. However, the light is then focused on an internal Image Intensifier which contains a photocathode tube which converts the faintest light images into electrons. The electrons accelerate across an electrostatic field striking a phosphor screen (much like a monochrome computer monitor) creating an image which you can see through the eyepiece.

Infrared Illuminator (I.R.): If there isn't enough ambient light to generate an image on the unit's phosphor screen, you can activate the Infrared (I.R.) Illuminator to send a beam of invisible infrared light to reflect back into the objective lens and convert into electrons. I.R. allows you to "see" deep into the darkest corner or in absolute pitch-black conditions without revealing your presence to anyone.

SCOPE MOUNTS:    www.conetrol.com

 

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